The different types of Audible Warning Signals

The different types of Audible Warning Signals

When choosing an audible warning signal for industrial purposes, there are some aspects you need to consider before choosing the correct signal.

Firstly, you need to consider what type of audible warning signal you require from a range of:

Electronic Sounders

In today’s world of technology, an electronic sounder is the most versatile product to use as this can be programmed to offer multiple tones and can be volume adjustable, making them suitable for almost every requirement. – – Sirens.

Sirens are a motor-powered device producing a unique sound due to its internal impeller.

Bells

Bells are suitable for daily signalling use that produces medium db output. Most commonly found in schools and workplaces to alert for lunch breaks.

Air Horns

Air horns are a good option for industrial & marine areas and hazardous areas. It is a non-electrical device with a high db output and low frequency, making it ideal for noisy environments.

Buzzers

This is an electro-mechanical type of warning signal in a robust housing. They produce medium-high db output with a low sound frequency

Hooters

Hooters are a motor-powered warning device with a horn. It has a high db output with low sound frequency, ideal for indoor and outdoor use.

You now need to take into consideration the sound level and frequency rating of your chosen alarm – this needs to be heard instantly and distinctly above any other noise in the area.

Next you need to consider the power consumption, electrical supply and IP rating of your chosen alarm and check with your engineer this will be suitable for your application.

Lastly you need to ensure you choose a quality product that will stand the test of time so to speak. By purchasing a quality product to begin with, it will save you time and money in the long run in maintenance, especially if the alarm is located in a hard to reach area.

Audible Warning Signals

Audible Warning Signals

We use audible warning signals every day in our daily lives albeit it in different forms – whether it be your alarm clock waking you in the morning, a bell to signal lunch break or a louder noise to signal an emergency situation.

When used for industrial purposes, there are some aspects you need to consider before choosing the correct signal.

Firstly you need to consider what type of audible warning signal you require from a range of:

Air horns

Air horns are a good option for industrial & marine areas and hazardous areas. It is a non-electrical device with a high db output and low frequency making it ideal for noisy environments.

Electronic sounders

In today’s world of technology, an electronic sounder is the most versatile product to use as this can be programmed to offer multiple tones and db selections for almost every requirement.

Bells

Bells are suitable for daily signalling use that produces medium db output. Most commonly found in schools and workplaces to alert for lunch breaks.

Hooters

Hooters are a motor-powered warning device with a horn. It has a high db output with low sound frequency, ideal for indoor and outdoor use.

Buzzers

This is an electro-mechanical type of warning signal in a robust housing. They produce medium-high db output with a low sound frequency.

Sirens

Sirens are a motor-powered device producing a unique sound due to its internal impeller.


You now need to take into consideration the sound level and frequency rating of your chosen alarm – this needs to be heard instantly and distinctly above any other noise in the area, for example above machinery noise.

Next you need to consider the power consumption, electrical supply and IP rating of your chosen alarm and check with your engineer this will be suitable for your application.

Lastly you need to ensure you choose a quality product that will stand the test of time so to speak. By purchasing a quality product to begin with, it will save you time and money in the long run in maintenance, especially if the alarm is located in a hard to reach area.

See more on our range of audible warning signals: https://beaconlamps.com/products/#132

Audible Warning Signals

Electronic Sounders

Electronic sounders are commonly used in large buildings and businesses as an indicator; the sounder makes a loud noise when it’s triggered, either automatically or manually. These powerful devices are perfect for grabbing people’s attention during an emergency situation but are also ideal for many different applications from schools to factories.

Such situations are to alert a specific time – break time, lunch time etc, to alerting to emergency situations such as a fire, robbery, or evacuation purposes. These products are so versatile they are also regularly used for fault monitoring purposes to alert when there is a problem on a production line.

When sounders are used in conjunction with an alarm system, the component that acts as a hub is the control panel. Every unit incorporated into the system will use the panel as a medium of communication. Using the correct sensors, an automatic signal can trigger the electronic sounder to sound. The control hub also allows an engineer and user to monitor the system and check for faults or activation.

Sounders can vary in sound dispersion patterns and tone and can also incorporate LED’s to become a combined sounder beacon for applications where both light and sound are required for maximum impact.

Safety should always be a priority, it’s important to be vigilant and look out for different tools and devices that grab a person’s attention during an emergency situation quickly and effectively. A loud sounder and flashing light too in some places do just that.

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Audible Warning Signals

Sounders & Sirens

Sounders and sirens are used to attract attention particularly when an immediate response is required. To alert a person, it is recommended that a sounder or siren reaches between 5 and 15 dB(A) louder than the background noise of the given area.

There are several things to consider before selecting a sounder or a siren:

  • The sound pressure level achieved (quoted as decibel or dB(A).
  • The distance it must be audible over.
  • The frequency quoted in Hz.
  • The background noise of the area it will be installed in.
  • The duration of each use – duty cycle or prolonged use.
  • Ensuring the tone of the sounder or siren does not sound similar to any machinery etc in the same area.

To enable an easy comparison, the dB(A) stated for a sounder or siren is usually measured at a distance of 1m. When the distance is doubled the dB(A) is to drop by 6. This is why it is important to know not only the dB(A) of the sounder or siren is capable of, but also the distance away from the intended area it will be placed.

Using our IAS-E sounder and MDS-2 siren as an example of this:

DistanceIAS-E SounderMDS-2 Siren
 
1m110 dB(A)114 dB(A)
2m104 dB(A)108 dB(A)
4m98 dB(A)102 dB(A)
16m86 dB(A)90 dB(A)
128m68 dB(A)72 dB(A)
256m62 dB(A)66 dB(A)
512m56 dB(A)60 dB(A)
1024mx54 dB(A)

As you can see from the above, when choosing a sounder or siren, louder is always better. It is worth noting however that studies have found that is it possible to distinguish a sound that is up to 10 dB below ambient as long as there is sufficient frequency differential.

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The different types of Audible Warning Signals

Electronic Sounders

Electronic sounders are a very commonly used audible signal as they can be multi-tone, have no moving parts and have no duty cycle making things much easier for the installer. These units are widely used as one unit can hold a variety of different tones making it easier to have different alarm noises representing different meanings in one building.

Electronic sounders usually have an adjustable volume control built inside them making these even easier for an installer to use in a wide range of areas; from schools for a lower tone to an industrial building for a louder tone.

An electronic sounder has more pro’s than con’s compared to for example, a Motor Driven Siren, a few can be seen below:

Pro’s:

– Usually have a high IP rating.

– Multi-stage tones with individual wires to trigger an alternative tone remotely.

– Have a variable frequency, tone and volume.

– Low current draw.

– Continuously rated with no duty cycle required.

– Can be combined with a beacon in one unit.

Con’s:

– Generally cost more than an alternative motor driven siren.

– Have a high frequency which doesn’t travel as well as a low frequency.

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