Have you seen our ICAO LED Obstacle Warning Beacon available with or without InfraRed?

Have you seen our ICAO LED Obstacle Warning Beacon available with or without InfraRed?

This fantastic unit packs a punch! Complies with ICAO Annex 14 Chapter 6 regulations for low intensity Type-B, fixed obstacle lights. Units with the InfraRed option are also compliant with the IR requirements for low intensity obstruction lights outlined by the Finnish Transport and Communications Agency.

Measuring 135mm x 94mmm this IP66 rated enclosure has a 360° light output around the vertical axis, designed using LED’s that offer a high light intensity to ensure that the required brightness levels are met with as little maintenance required as possible by the end-user.

This beacon is perfectly suited to the outdoor environment with its carefully designed enclosure to minimise dust and dirt build up, is fully water tight and has an anti-tamper screw into a blind hole in the lens fitting.

What more could you ask for did you say? How about pre-moulded drillouts for M10 & M20 cable gland entries and long-life LED’s?! In particular using long life LED’s makes maintenance a thing of the past with this beacon, perfectly suited for those hard to reach areas where ICAO Obstruction Warning Beacons are required for!

For further information, please feel free to click on the link below:

https://dgcontrolsdatasheets.epim.online/Datasheet?part=09530600019&template=DGControlsDatasheet

*NEW!* SBB TYPE-B  I.C.A.O WARNING BEACON

*NEW!* SBB TYPE-B I.C.A.O WARNING BEACON

ICAO LED Obstacle Warning Beacon available with or without InfraRed LEDs

135mm high x 94mm diameter

The latest addition to the deegee range is the SBB/LED/Type-B/Red, which is an ICAO Warning Beacon available with or without InfraRed LEDs.

– The SBB/LED/Type-B/Red complies with ICAO Annex 14 Chapter 6 regulations for Low Intensity Type B, fixed obstacle lights. Units with Infra-Red (IR) are also compliant with the IR requirements for Low Intensity Obstruction Lights outlined by the Finnish Transport and Communications Agency.

– Housed in an IP66 rated enclosure, pre-moulded with drill-outs for M10 & M20 cable gland entries.

– Carefully designed to minimise dust and dirt build up, and fully water-tight, Series B is perfectly suited to the outdoor environment, and with long-life LEDs, makes maintenance a thing of the past.

Call or email our Sales Team for more information – Email: mail@beaconlamps.com Tel: 01283 550850

Cranes and Warning Beacons

Due to their tall construction, warning devices for cranes are essential not only for the general public but also for nearby aircraft. These warning signals help construction workers and pilots alike to detect a possible danger and give a signal to avoid collisions with other cranes, structures and aircraft. The use of beacons helps to minimise this risk.
When installing a beacon on a crane, it is essential to consider the standards required – for example the number of obstruction lights to use, their visibility and position. It is also necessary to ensure they meet the regulations of ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) and FAA (Federal Aviation Administration).

When choosing the correct obstruction light, the type of crane and its height needs to be considered; the type of crane will be the basis for the number of lights needed to be installed and the height is the basis for the type of obstruction light required.
Standards do change and get updated, so please do check with your local authority before installing to a crane, but currently the standard height is 150 meters. If a crane is below this height, an obstruction light is required only if it’s location can be a danger to air navigation. If a crane is above this height, an obstruction light must be installed.


As a guide, the type of light to be fitted:
Low Intensity fixed red lights.
Used on cranes and tower cranes between 60 to 90 meters high, they are usually installed on top of the crane to ensure visibility. These lights should be visible in every direction.

Medium Intensity fixed red lights.
Used on cranes between 90 to 150 meters high, they are usually installed on top of the crane and on the cranes jib. These lights should be visible in every direction.

2000cd fixed red lights.
These lights are installed for night use.
For cranes that are 150 meters tall and above, they are installed close to the top and placed with a 50 meter gap in between. For every additional 50 meters on the crane’s height, an additional beacon needs to be installed.

See more here: https://beaconlamps.com/products/visual-warning-signals/i.c.a.o.-warning-signals/

Aviation Light Signals

Aviation lighting is essential in keeping everyone safe; it ensures that building and objects can be seen in low light as well as helping both the pilot and air traffic controller communicate on landing in the form of light signals. In case of communication failure or when an aircraft isn’t equipped with a radio, light signals are used using a signal lamp. Signal lamps have focused bright beams that can generate red, white and green lights which can be steady or flashing. Each of these colours and patterns are instructions for aircraft pilots and have a specific meaning, depending whether the aircraft is in flight or on the ground. The aircraft pilot must recognize both the colour and pattern (steady or flashing) to properly decode the message from the control tower. Aircraft pilots can acknowledge these instructions by rocking the aircraft wings, moving the ailerons, or by flashing their navigation lights.

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Aviation Light Signal Colours and their meanings

Just like a traffic light, aviation light signals use three different colours. However, instead of red, green and amber, used by road traffic signals, the Air Traffic Control light signals use the colours red, green and white. As mentioned above, each of these colours have a specific meaning and vary depending whether the aircraft is in flight or on the ground.

Aviation Light Signals on the Ground

Steady Green Light – The steady green light signal on the ground means the aircraft is cleared for takeoff and the pilot may proceed for takeoff.

Flashing Green – The flashing green light signal on the ground means that the aircraft is cleared or authorized to taxi.

Steady Red – The steady red light means the aircraft must stop immediately and hold their position.

Flashing Red –The flashing red light means the aircraft must taxi clear of the runway in use or get off the runway. The air traffic controller wants the aircraft pilot to find the nearest taxiway and get off the runway to allow other aircraft to use the runway.

Flashing White – The flashing white signal means the aircraft pilot must return to their starting point. The air traffic controller wants the pilot to return to the airport parking apron.

Alternating Red/Green – In countries such as the United States, the alternating red/green signal light means an important warning to the aircraft pilot to exercise extreme caution.

Aviation Light Signals in the Air

Steady Green – Green signal lights always indicate a GO. This means the aircraft is cleared to land.

Flashing Green – The flashing green light signal to an aircraft in flight means the aircraft should return for landing and is essentially a Go-Around command. The aircraft do not have a clearance to land, so the aircraft must return for landing via Go-Around.

Steady Red – Red light signals always indicate a stop command. However, an aircraft in flight is impossible to stop. So red light signal for an aircraft in flight means, the aircraft must continue circling and give way to other aircraft until the air traffic controller indicates that you are cleared to land by giving a steady green light.

Flashing Red – A Flashing Red light signal to an aircraft in flight indicates danger, the airport is unsafe and do not land.

Alternating Red/Green –Alternating Red/Green light signal applies to both aircraft on the ground and in flight. It indicates the aircraft pilot to exercise extreme caution.

Light signals are rarely used today by aircraft pilots because of the presence of radio for communication. However, radios are not always reliable and sometimes stop working. In times of communication failure, this will come in handy and is really important for aircraft navigation. An aircraft pilot will have the need to fall back on Aviation Light Signals for communication in order to avoid accident and ensure safety.

Communication is also key between the pilot and obstacles along his flight path – such as high buildings, masts, towers etc. To alert the pilot to the danger of these, warning beacon lamps are added to tall objects. The use of such lighting is intended to reduce hazards to aircraft by indicating the presence of obstacles.

The presence of objects which must be lighted, should be indicated by low, medium or high intensity obstacle warning light, or a combination of such lights.

Fixed obstacles of 45m or less in height, width and length are normally lit by a single, steady, red light, placed at the highest practicable point. Obstacles of greater size are normally provided with additional red lights in order to outline the extent of the building.

D.G. Controls offer a range of Type-A and Type-B Beacons that meet ICAO Annex 14, Chapter 6 requirements for Low Intensity Obstruction Warning and can be found at:

https://beaconlamps.com/products/visual-warning-signals/i.c.a.o.-warning-signals/

How Signalling Devices Ensure Safety During Crane Operations

Safety is crucial where crane operations are in place, especially between the operators and other workers wherein loads are nearby. So, audible and visual warnings become an essential to avoid significant damages.

What is a Crane Operation?

Crane operations make construction work so much easier. It is responsible for carrying heavy loads from one place to another with less intervention from people.  Therefore, extra help is needed to avoid any difficulties in transferring materials such as the risk of injuries among workers.

Some use hand signals to fulfill safety requirements within the facility with crane operation. This technique requires a signal person to ensure everything is operating smoothly under its control. Different hand  signals usually have different meanings in this environment, hence, the room for error is highly possible and could affect the entire operation.

How Do Signalling Devices Work?

Beacon signalling devices are a simpler solution in maintaining safety with crane operations. They are composed of audible and visual signals to reduce the risk of harm or damage, and benefit all types of workers in all conditions.

When choosing a device, it is essential that the noise level and / or brightness is considered for the environment. Failing to consider these factors may not provide the full advantage of the warning device.

The decibel level must not be less than 5dB and more than 10dB to achieve friendlier sound pressure. A sounder device should be installed toward the load to deliver warning straightway.

For visual warning devices, the brightness level will depend on distance, unlike the audio signal. It should be installed on the crane’s bridge for better visibility thus reduces risk.

Another important factor to consider is the easy installation to get started. Most warning devices for crane operations are shipped ready to install, commonly mounted on the crane. They are usually built with LEDs for energy saver applications thus brighter than most other type of lights.

Sounder and the visual combinations are also available on the market, providing maximum safety and benefitting not only the workforce, but the entire crane operation.

Advantages of Signalling Devices in Crane Operations

Reduced Risk

Hearing a coming crane within the facility can be difficult, and so avoiding the risk of injuries. A signalling device will warn personnel of the approaching danger by a crane carrying loads of heavy equipment. As a result, the possible danger is highly avoided.

Reduced Lost time

When the crane operation is going smoothly, improved safety is the result. The main reason for the downtime over a crane is the warning personnel, mentioned earlier, using hand signals. With the help of proper signalling devices, a smooth, efficient process can be assured.

Reduced Revenue Loss

Revenue is a great sign of a facility doing better operations. Proper maintenance of the warning devices will bring more profit in the long-run, even when it demands more initial cost.  

Efficient Operation

The signalling devices also speed up the operation, with safety in mind. It actually promotes saving up costs for future uses. Warning devices ensure safety against possible collisions in and out of the facility.

Final Thoughts

To sum it all, crane operations will be better all round with properly installed signalling devices. They assure safety for all the work force inside the facility and also help speed up the overall business. The fear of sudden collisions against heavy equipment can be reduced by the use of these warning devices. See our website to find your preferred device, which continue to benefit construction sites around the globe.

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