Exactly what is a Beacon Light…?

Exactly what is a Beacon Light…?

Beacon lights provide warning, signal and guidance with their powerful light and colour – they play a vital part in providing safety to the world we live in. Their powerful light attracts instant attention to the end-user and even if the end-user does not understand the colour code, they will immediately understand to proceed with caution from the bright light.

Different types of beacon lights and different colours are utilised in different applications and situations to provide warning and guidance to the public. Below are just a few examples of colour and industry requirements:

Colour Requirement:

·        Red beacons usually indicate danger, hazards, and emergency situations. The colour red is considered as a powerful signal that can trigger an automatic message to any viewer.

·        Amber/Yellow beacons are used to warn people to be cautious and to be aware that a hazard may be upcoming. This colour triggers people to slow down instinctively.

·        Green beacons indicate safety, it delivers a message that a particular situation is currently being handled and the area is safe. This colour offers people assurance that everything is under control.

·        Blue beacons are most commonly used on emergency vehicles, they provide a clear difference to when red beacons are being used ensuring the viewer can differentiate between the emergency situation at hand.

·        Clear beacons are often used alongside other coloured beacons and are often used in offices and schools as an alternative indication left open to the end-users specific requirements.

Industry Requirement:

·        Emergency vehicles tend to use rotating beacons. They are extremely effective as they have an extremely high light output and are suitable in vibration atmospheres.

·        Aviation industries tend to use a solid red beacon which provide a very specific angle and brightness of light. They are used to guide pilots onto a runway and are also used on tall buildings as a further guide to pilots.

·        Rail industries tend to use red wig-wag lights which flash alternatively to help those outside the train to take notice of the approaching vehicle.

·        Marine industries require a very high IP rated beacon light and is commonly the colour red as it is mostly used at night and this colour provides an unmistakable warning.

·        On roads, traffic management systems use many different types of lights from red cross warning to green walking man, you will most commonly see a red/amber/green traffic light. It provides a simple and effective instruction for the road user and pedestrian alike. 

Meet some of the Team!

Here at deegee we pride ourselves on our fabulous team!

Our friendly Sales Team are always on hand to help do the hard work for you! They can help you to choose the correct product for your application, go to onsite visits on your behalf and help you gather all information together you may need to include in your presentations from data sheets to certifications and video’s of your chosen product.

We have an onsite Technical Design Engineer who is always up for a challenge – whether it is re-designing a product to match your specification or creating a whole new product for you, no query is too big for our Matt.

Use our 56 years in the business to your advantage! Contact Lisa, Stacey or Matt with any assistance you may need with your Beacon lights, Warning lights, Safety lights or Sounders; however big or small your enquiry, you can always rely on us!

Tel: 01283 550850

Email: mail@beaconlamps.com

What is a Beacon?

What is a Beacon?

What is a beacon? What applications would require a beacon?? Let us enlighten you!

A beacon is a purposely noticeable device that is designed to attract attention to a certain location. Beacons are undeniably one of the most beneficial devices that we have that helps not only in providing safety, but also security.

In today’s modern age of technology, beacons have been used to assist and support many different applications and continue to work well as they draw the attention required to create a safe and secure environment.

The top applications/areas beacons are most commonly used are:

Industrial/Marine Applications; for example, loading bays, warehouses, factory floor and marine ports/docks.
Since industrial and marine environments can be hazardous, it’s important to consider a product that can withstand harsh weather conditions, shock and vibration.
Within an industrial environment they also need to be bright and loud enough to be seen/heard over the machinery that may be in place.

Fire Warning Applications; for example, fitted to ceilings and doors to alert to fire exits and assembly points, pointing to the location of fire-fighting equipment.
These warning signals are usually installed in commercial buildings and other establishments that require added public safety measures such as hospitals and schools.

Automotive Applications; for example, slow moving vehicles, forklift trucks, emergency vehicles, tractors and airport baggage vehicles.
Automotive applications generally use amber, flashing warning signals however there are some instances when this needs to be changed, for example emergency vehicles require a coloured flashing light, mostly blue or red.

Don’t hesitate to contact our dedicated in-house Sales Team for more information! Tel: 01283 550850 Emal: mail@beaconlamps.com

Beacon Colours Explained

Beacons convey strong and vital messages in the colours they use; they allow people to become more aware of their surroundings and any possible dangers that may be on-coming. These devices deliver messages in their colour and their position, place and time of use.

Knowing the meaning behind the colours of beacons will allow you to determine their purpose for your next action and if installing them, will allow you to choose the right colour you require.

As a general guideline:

Colour: Red.

The colour red is usually associated with strong messages such as danger, hazard and emergency situations. Red is considered as a powerful signal that can trigger an automatic message to any viewer. Red coloured beacons are mostly used to warn people to keep away from a dangerous area/situation.

Colour: Amber/Yellow.

The colour amber or yellow often triggers a person’s thoughts to slow down and to be cautious. For this reason, amber colours beacons are used on slow moving vehicles, on construction sites, airports and in other establishments to increase awareness to crowds.

Colour: Green.

The colour green indicates safety, it delivers a message that a particular situation is currently being handled and the area is safe. This colour signal offers people assurance that everything is under control.

Colour: Blue.

The colour blue is mostly used by emergency vehicles – for this reason blue beacons are not applicable to be used in certain places such as public roads. If you are not certain if a blue beacon is the right colour for your application, it’s best to check with officials in your local government who will advise further.

Colour: Clear.

White beacons are often used alongside other coloured beacons and are generally used in offices and schools as an alternative indication. This indication is generally left open to the end-users specific requirements.

It is worth noting that colour is not the only thing to consider when searching the right beacon to use, the type of lamp, mode and brightness are also important factors that need consideration.

What is a beacon?

What Is A Beacon?

A beacon is a purposely noticeable device that is designed to attract attention to a certain location.

Beacons are undeniably one of the most beneficial devices that we have that helps not only in providing safety, but also security.

There are many different types of beacons on the market today, from aircraft beacons to telephone beacons, they are all used for a particular purpose and play a vital role in their application.

Today beacons are electronic devices that light up when power is applied, however beacons have been around for much longer than the modern day! In the past, beacon fires were lit to assist and alert people to a danger – for example used in lighthouses for navigation at sea and even for signalling in war that an enemy was approaching to alert defences. Beacon systems have been used for centuries in this way.

Coming back to today’s age, with the use of modern technology beacons have been used to assist and support many different applications and continue to work well as they draw the attention required to create a safe and secure environment.

Such applications include:

 – Giving safe direction      

 – Alert of high-rise structures

– Emergency vehicles  

– Flood alert